Dying to Religion and Empire: Giving up Our Religious Rites and Legal Rights

Dying to Religion and Empire: Giving up Our Religious Rites and Legal Rights

Dying to Religion and Empire Giving up Our Religious Rites and Legal Rights Could Christianity exist without religious rites or legal rights In Dying to Religion and Empire Jeremy Myers not only answers this question with an emphatic Yes but argues that if the church is goin

  • Title: Dying to Religion and Empire: Giving up Our Religious Rites and Legal Rights
  • Author: Jeremy Myers
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 365
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Could Christianity exist without religious rites or legal rights In Dying to Religion and Empire, Jeremy Myers not only answers this question with an emphatic Yes but argues that if the church is going to thrive in the coming decades, we must give up our religious rites and legal rights Regarding religious rites, Jeremy Myers calls up on the church to abandon the quasCould Christianity exist without religious rites or legal rights In Dying to Religion and Empire, Jeremy Myers not only answers this question with an emphatic Yes but argues that if the church is going to thrive in the coming decades, we must give up our religious rites and legal rights Regarding religious rites, Jeremy Myers calls up on the church to abandon the quasi magical traditions of water baptism and the Lord s Supper and transform or redeem these practices so that they reflect the symbolic meaning and intent which they had in New Testament times Further, the church has become far too dependent upon certain legal rights for our continued existence Ideas such as the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are not conducive to living as the people of God who are called to follow Jesus into servanthood and death Also, reliance upon the freedom of speech, the freedom of assembly, and other such freedoms as established by the Bill of Rights have made the church a servant of the state rather than a servant of God and the gospel Such freedoms must be forsaken if we are going to live within the rule and reign of God on earth This book not only challenges religious and political liberals but conservatives as well It is a call to leave behind the comfortable religion we know, and follow Jesus into the uncertain and wild ways of radical discipleship To rise and live in the reality of God s Kingdom, we must first die to religion and empire.

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      365 Jeremy Myers
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      Posted by:Jeremy Myers
      Published :2019-04-12T00:01:44+00:00

    938 Comment

    I like the first part of the book about the practices of bautism and communion that once may have had great meaning and purpose but that now in our current context no longer make sense, and in fact distract from the original purpose. That reminds me about a lesson from Anthony De Mello story of the Guru’s cat:"When the guru sat down to worship each evening, the ashram cat would get in the way and distract the worshipers. So he ordered that the cat be tied during evening worship. After the guru [...]

    Good Reading, good pointsJeremy makes many good points in this book, especially to the American way of christianity. Rather than exerting our rights and freedoms, we should focus on how Jesus lived and what he taught. Living for the good of others is more important than making sure everything goes our way. Living life with Jesus as our example will lead us to live completely different than insisting on the legal rights we have, and changing some of the religious rites we've been taught.

    This is a great book. My favorite by Jeremy Myers that I have read so far. The first section deals with baptism and the Lords supper and the author does a great job in explaining the meaning behind the mere symbolic rituals and challenges Christians to move beyond religious observance and into meaningful practice of both baptism and communion. There is a surprising suggestion made by the author that both of these practices may be more meaningful if adjusted to engage ones own culture in a more r [...]

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