Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots

Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots

Looking for Lost Bird A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots Adopted on the black market Yvette went to live with an affluent older couple in New York They filled her days with piano lessons ballet and art classes and wished her sweet dreams in a canopy bed

  • Title: Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots
  • Author: Yvette Melanson Claire Safran
  • ISBN: 9780380976010
  • Page: 443
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Adopted on the black market, Yvette went to live with an affluent older couple in New York They filled her days with piano lessons, ballet and art classes, and wished her sweet dreams in a canopy bed But then love faltered, replaced by grief and rejection Striking out on her own, Yvette went to Israel and sought comfort among Kibbutz friends and army comrades, then retuAdopted on the black market, Yvette went to live with an affluent older couple in New York They filled her days with piano lessons, ballet and art classes, and wished her sweet dreams in a canopy bed But then love faltered, replaced by grief and rejection Striking out on her own, Yvette went to Israel and sought comfort among Kibbutz friends and army comrades, then returned to the states, no closer to finding peace with herself With deep yearning and wry humor, Yvette tells of finally finding her reality a truth that she could never have conjured for herself.Moving to a hidden corner of the Navajo reservation, she is met by strangers who say they are her family In the mystery of their ceremonies and in the daily rhythms of reservation life, she learns about Navajo spirituality, about medicine men and Changing Woman, about winds that whisper and ghosts that walk.This is the story of a woman yearning to fit into an unknown heritage Even as she learns to weave Navajo rugs, she looks for ways to intertwine her Jewish faith and the Navajo one to lace the Biblical story of Adam and Even with the Navajo tales of the corn people Exploring the secrets of identity and the meaning of family, she measures the ties of upbringing against the tug of blood What she finds is faith, in all its forms, and love, in all its faces.

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      443 Yvette Melanson Claire Safran
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      Posted by:Yvette Melanson Claire Safran
      Published :2019-07-07T10:09:48+00:00

    589 Comment

    This is a fascinating true story of a woman raised white and Jewish who discovers later that she and her twin brother were actually stolen (yes, stolen) from her Navajo parents as babies, ferried across several states and eventually adopted out to two different families. Even before Yvette discovers her genetic identity, she lives a fascinating life -- mostly loved and cherished by both parents until her mother dies when she's about 12. Her father from that point on rejects her, partly because s [...]

    This is an unusual view of the Navajo culture. It's not written by an anthropologist, a missionary, or a scholar. Rather it's the view of someone who tries to assimilate into the culture when all she's known for 43 years is the "Indian stereotype." She shares her thoughts as she makes the adjustment. I'd like to know if this is her voice or that of the co-author. And, I'd like to know how she's doing now, almost 20 years after this book was written. Now that DNA testing is more widely available, [...]

    This is the true story of Yvette Melanson, a woman who along with her twin was stolen as a baby. She was adopted and raised by a Jewish family. She was loved, taken care of and taken to dance classes and piano lessons by her adoptive mother. Yvette had always questioned where she came from her, but her life was good and she was happy.But then at age 13 her adoptive mother passes away. Rejection and grief follow. Yvette goes out on her own, going to Israel, joining the army and eventually meeting [...]

    It was the subtitle, “A Jewish Woman Discovers her Navajo Roots,” that really grabbed my interest in this book. It sounds improbable, but this is a true story, well told. Yvette and her twin brother were born on the Navajo Reservation of Indian parents, but were stolen from the hospital and sold on the black market. Separated from her brother, Yvette was adopted by a well-to-do Jewish couple in Florida. Until her adoptive other died, life was smooth for Yvette, but her adoptive father turned [...]

    An interesting memoir about a woman, adopted in by a Jewish family in the 1950s, who discovers that she and her twin brother were stolen from a Navajo family. She moves to the reservation to explore her heritage.This was a quick read, written in a simple manner. I was fascinated by her descriptions of her life on the reservation, as well as her mention of the time she lived in Israel after high school. Melanson has certainly had an interesting life. But I never really connected with the story--t [...]

    I learned a part of Native American history that I'd never heard about - and I wasn't very surprised to learn. As Americans (and especially concerning the Native Americans) we've always thought we knew what was best for everyone we considered inferior. I haven't made up my mind about how selfish this woman is (only in respect to taking her children to such an impoverished and isolated area) or how brave she was to give up everything she knew and jump at the chance to totally commit herself to im [...]

    This book didn't grab me as much as I thought it would, while an interesting premise, the book came to no conclusions. Not sure if the issue is that I am recovering from illness and my overall sense of malaise is interfering with my level of interest, or if personal narrative is difficult and this book was written at at time when Yvette was still discovering her story.

    Fascinating memoir of a Navaho woman, stolen as an infant and raised on Long Island by her Jewish adoptive family. She lived many lives in 35 years. This is the story of her return to her Native American roots. Great read.

    I am in the process of converting this book blog from one that took review copies to one that tracks my wishlist reading. When I was so focused on writing reviews for authors and publicists, I was stopped having fun with my posts. The writing became formulaic and to some degree, so did the reading. Now that I am back to doing this blog for fun (as it should be) I'm going to go back to telling the stories behind the books I chose to read. These are my stories. They might be nonsense but I want to [...]

    2015: In my desire to focus on my TBR books this year, I pulled this off the shelf and am so glad I did. I really enjoyed this story. Yvette tells her story of finding her Navajo family and moving to the reservation with unflinching honesty, interspersed with stories of her earlier life. The story is interesting and her attempts to learn about Navajo culture and begin to live in harmony were quite touching. The descriptions of Navajo religious life were fascinating and I found myself intrigued b [...]

    This is another example of how a good idea, a true story, is messed up because of the editing. The historical information held my attention as did the part that described life living with the Navajos in Arizona. But the jumping back and forth from one life event to another, the contrived mysticism, and the characters' unpredictable emotional changes left me wondering why I bothered to finish the book. I wish Yvette would redo this book with a good editor. Her story is an amazing journey, but it' [...]

    As someone who doesn't know a lot about the Navajo lifestyle or beliefs, I thought this book gave a very good introduction and overview, while also conveying this woman's interesting life story. The writing style wasn't particularly fabulous or un-fabulous. A lot of turns of phrase were repeated, which made the writing less attractive, and which broke my suspension of disbelief on a couple of occasions. However, the content was enough to keep me interested and I definitely felt the book was wort [...]

    Minnie Bob, and her brother Bob Minnie, adopted at birth, find their way "home" to the Navajo reservation. A first person narrative story, told by Claire Safran in a comfortable style. I was fascinated by the poverty, overall family feeling, personal determination to succeed, and general personal gutsiness of Yvette as she clambers through several years of struggles to become comfortable with being a Navajo.I'm looking forward to finding "The Lost Child" movie.

    I first heard about this story from a movie on the Hallmark channel. I read the book and the movie was fairly true to the book. The story is of Navaho twins who were stolen from their parents and given to white parents and how they find their way back to their tribe and family. Evidently this was done somewhat frequently which is just another horrific story of racism. Good read.

    Interesting book. I especially connected with how she incorporated the Navajo's Vision Quest into how she re-told this part of her life. The vision quest is asking 3 questions: 1) Who am I, 2) What have I become with the who that I am, and 3)What is my purpose.Also interesting to read about the similarities and clashes between her Jewish upbringing and her new Navajo culture.

    3.75 stars. Memoir by a woman who grew up thinking she was white and Jewish, only to find out that she was born Navajo and stolen from her parents shortly after birth and sent across the country to be adopted. This chronicles her search for her Navajo family and how she is assimilated into the "rez." Learned a lot about Navajo culture.

    This is a story of a woman adopted as a child, raised in a New York Jewish home who began a journey to find her roots. This lead her to Northen Arizona to a Navajo/Dineh family. It is full of struggle and compassion which would be of interest to adoptees, Native Americans and anyone interested in discovering her past.

    I loved this book and I had a difficult time putting it down. It was a required text for my introduction to Native American Studies course and I only read half of it during the winter semester. I picked it up again this summer and read the whole thing in only a few days. It is a captivating tale of a woman's quest for her family and heritage. I would suggest that everyone reads this book.

    Haunting. Beautifully Written, Utterly Heart-Breaking. I Was Absolutely Fascinated With This Empowering Novel. I Could Not Put It Down. Highly Recommended.

    Interesting but too many Indian ceremonial descriptions. I highly respect the author's roots, life and writings.

    What an awesome story! Having lived on the Navajo reservation myself,and experiencing the beauty of the Dine, this story filled me with joy.

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