The Wasting of Borneo: Dispatches from a Vanishing World

The Wasting of Borneo: Dispatches from a Vanishing World

The Wasting of Borneo Dispatches from a Vanishing World Acclaimed naturalist Alex Shoumatoff issues a worldwide call to protect the drastically endangered rainforests of BorneoIn his eleventh book but his first in almost two decades seasoned travel write

  • Title: The Wasting of Borneo: Dispatches from a Vanishing World
  • Author: Alex Shoumatoff
  • ISBN: 9780807078242
  • Page: 307
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Acclaimed naturalist Alex Shoumatoff issues a worldwide call to protect the drastically endangered rainforests of BorneoIn his eleventh book, but his first in almost two decades, seasoned travel writer Alex Shoumatoff takes readers on a journey from the woods of rural New York to the rain forests of the and Borneo, documenting both the abundance of life and the threAcclaimed naturalist Alex Shoumatoff issues a worldwide call to protect the drastically endangered rainforests of BorneoIn his eleventh book, but his first in almost two decades, seasoned travel writer Alex Shoumatoff takes readers on a journey from the woods of rural New York to the rain forests of the and Borneo, documenting both the abundance of life and the threats to these vanishing Edens in a wide ranging narrative.Alex and his best friend, Davie, spent their formative years in the forest of Bedford, New York As adults they grew apart, but bonded by the imaginary jungle of their childhood, Alex and Davie reunited fifty years later for a trip to a real jungle, in the heart of Borneo During the intervening years, Alex had become an author and literary journalist, traveling the world to bring to light places, animals, and indigenous cultures in peril The two reconnect and spend three weeks together on Borneo, one of the most imperiled ecosystems on earth Insatiable demand for the palm oil ubiquitous in consumer goods is wiping out the world s most ancient and species rich rain forest, home to the orangutan and countless other life forms, including the Penan people, with whom Alex and Davie camp The Penan have been living in Borneo s rain forest for millennia, but 90 percent of the lowland rain forest has already been logged and burned to make way for vast oil palm plantations Among the most endangered tribal people on earth, the Penan are fighting for their right to exist.Shoumatoff condenses a lifetime of learning about what binds humans to animals, nature, and each other, culminating in a celebration of the Penan and a call for Westerners to address the palm oil crisis and protect the biodiversity that sustains us all.

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      Published :2019-07-04T09:15:06+00:00

    142 Comment

    DNF at around 50%. The author has spent most of his life wandering the world, and he spent most of this book wandering around a point and never finding it. Despite being a book that purports to be about the ravaging of the rainforests in Borneo (an extremely important subject), it takes almost halfway through the (less than 200 page) book for him to get there. Like a typical baby boomer, he spends a lot of time groaning about how the generations that came after his are not connected to nature, s [...]

    A rambling account of Borneo, rather like your dear old uncle in the nursing home you visited as a child. He had good tales, but rambled around and went from idea to idea in a stream of consciousness kind of way. It is interesting, but also tiresome after a while. Alex Shoumatoff mainly writes about palm oil tree farming in Borneo, and how it adversely affects the rain forest and the lives of indigenous people like the Penan. His writing goes from the origin of music to religion to forest storie [...]

    Couldn't get through it. Too much like a textbook and too much about the author's life before he went to Borneo. Could have been interesting if he were a better writer.

    This book really disappointed me. Maybe 10% was about the wasting of Borneo. 70% was about traditional people in Borneo and the and 20% about animal cognition & emotion and interviews with animal scientists. While the book makes a, in my opinion right, moral appeal to reduce palm oil consumption, no arguments are given at all. The author could have spent more time investigating the destructive effects of palm oil on the environment and on the local people.The authors description of living a [...]

    This is a striking work, chronicling one man's journey toward connecting to the natural world and his attempts to not just understand vanishing cultures and worlds, but help to document and save them. From the stories of his first connecting to animals and the forests around his childhood home, on to experiences in Borneo, Shoumatoff paints the natural world and its inhabitants with careful and elegant strokes, offering attention to details that few people might have noticed. As a whole, the boo [...]

    I was initially prepared to be a bit bored with this book expecting lots of facts and figures but instead was completely drawn into this amazing read. The better part of my childhood was spent in the woods absorbing the beauty of nature; sitting at the edge of a small creek for hours, running through brush (that is until the day I came face to face with an enormous web with a garden spider at the center just inches from my face which curtailed the running part for a while.) Like the author, I tr [...]

    Fascinating book -- the author has spent his life experiencing and reporting on the threatened natural areas left in the world and the aboriginals who live in the area whose lives are being ruined. I was appalled at the Palm Oil Plantations and was horrified when I went to an online list showing all the products its used in.Thousands of animal species, insects, butterflies and birds have Borneo as their last refuge and they are being logged, burned and turned into palm oil plantations. The Chine [...]

    For anyone who enjoys anything to do with nature and learning about different cultures, you'll love this book. It is a book everyone should read because it has a lot to offer about planet earth and our filthy ways that we often don't think twice about. I really enjoyed reading it and I did receive a copy through the giveaway program.

    This book calls attention to the continual ravage of the globe for economic gains. How we continue to be so short sighted in the current condition of ancient and species and and countless other life-forms is beyond conception. Thanks to Alex Shoumatoff and other writers who continue to spread the awareness of global rape.

    I expected this book to be more about Borneo. At its heart this was a book of nature essays about various regions with the longest narrative being about Borneo. I lost interest early on as Shoumatoff's voice didn't do it for me. Probably appropriate for people who generally like nature writing that is animal-heavy, but it wasn't for me. I wouldn't read his other work based on this book.

    What could have been an interesting (and important) read about the destruction of Borneo's rain forest is instead a meandering, unfocused, semi-autobiographical account of the author's life leading up to a trip to Borneo with a childhood friend. It is more of an eco-travelogue than a serious discussion about the fate Borneo forests.

    A bit disjointed at times but still an important book on the horrors of palm oil and the loss of rain forests and the resulting wildlife destruction. Shoumatoff's early work in the New Yorker was vastly clearer . . .

    I received a copy of this book from librarything's earlyreviewers group in exchange for an honest review. I was put off initially because it did not dive into the promised topic right away. The author is a long experienced nature journalist. I picked this book because of its content, I hadn't even heard of the author. So it turned me off when the beginning was more about him than the promised topic. It starts with an introduction to the author's childhood experiences in the forests surrounding h [...]

    If nothing else is taken away from reading The Wasting of Borneo: Dispatches from a Vanishing World, this is the important thing to remember; Stop buying anything with palm oil in it, or buy as little as possible. The devastation caused by the millions of acres of palm oil plantations is almost beyond belief. When the rain forests with their old growth trees are cut and burned to be replaced by palm oil plantations, the deep peat below the surface burns for months. Hundreds of orangutans are fou [...]

    Review: The Wasting Of Borneo by Alex Shoumatoff. 3★'s 04/20/2017Alex Shoumatoff is a pronounce naturalist speaking out to protect the endangered rainforest of Borneo Island. This is an interesting book about the dangers of Borneo’s rainforest, people, animals, and the diverse ecosystem being overlooked. The most endangered tribal people on earth, the Penan are fighting for their right to exist along with the orangutan, and other life forms, who habitat the rainforest of Borneo Island. Shoum [...]

    THE WASTING OF BORNEO: DISPATCHES FROM A VANISHING WORLD by Alex Shoumatoff. This book was sent to me by Beacon Press in exchange for an unbiased and honest review. The exchange was sponsored by LibraryThing’s Early Review program.Alex Shoumatoff has been a staff writer for The New Yorker and a contributing writer for Vanity Fair, Conde’ Nast, Esquire, Travel & Leisure and Onearth. He has written several books and developed a website - Dispatches from the vanishing world - to raise consc [...]

    Alex Shoumatoff has certainly had an illustrious career. He has published several books, written hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles, and traveled to some of the farthest reaches of the planet, places where normal people such as myself may never get to see. It isn’t the inability to get on a plane and fly to Venezuela that’s stopping us; no, it’s the fact that these Eden-like, natural sanctuaries are disappearing rapidly. The rainforests of Borneo are disintegrating in the wake of [...]

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