That Kind of Mother

That Kind of Mother

That Kind of Mother That Kind of Mother dives deep into big questions about parenthood adoption and race Is mothering something learned or that you re born to How far can good intentions stretch And most of all can l

  • Title: That Kind of Mother
  • Author: Rumaan Alam
  • ISBN: 9780062667601
  • Page: 359
  • Format: Hardcover
  • That Kind of Mother dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race Is mothering something learned, or that you re born to How far can good intentions stretch And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class With his unerring eye for nuance and unsparing sense of irony, Rumaan Alam s second novel is both heartfelt and t That Kind of Mother dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race Is mothering something learned, or that you re born to How far can good intentions stretch And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class With his unerring eye for nuance and unsparing sense of irony, Rumaan Alam s second novel is both heartfelt and thought provoking Celeste Ng, author of Little Fires EverywhereFrom the celebrated author of Rich and Pretty, a novel about the families we fight to build and those we fight to keepLike many first time mothers, Rebecca Stone finds herself both deeply in love with her newborn son and deeply overwhelmed Struggling to juggle the demands of motherhood with her own aspirations and feeling utterly alone in the process, she reaches out to the only person at the hospital who offers her any real help Priscilla Johnson and begs her to come home with them as her son s nanny.Priscilla s presence quickly does as much to shake up Rebecca s perception of the world as it does to stabilize her life Rebecca is white, and Priscilla is black, and through their relationship, Rebecca finds herself confronting, for the first time, the blind spots of her own privilege She feels profoundly connected to the woman who essentially taught her what it means to be a mother When Priscilla dies unexpectedly in childbirth, Rebecca steps forward to adopt the baby But she is unprepared for what it means to be a white mother with a black son As she soon learns, navigating motherhood for her is a matter of learning how to raise two children whom she loves with equal ferocity, but whom the world is determined to treat differently.Written with the warmth and psychological acuity that defined his debut, Rumaan Alam has crafted a remarkable novel about the lives we choose, and the lives that are chosen for us.

    • ↠ That Kind of Mother || ☆ PDF Read by ↠ Rumaan Alam
      359 Rumaan Alam
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ That Kind of Mother || ☆ PDF Read by ↠ Rumaan Alam
      Posted by:Rumaan Alam
      Published :2019-02-06T11:13:34+00:00

    369 Comment

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for nuance and unsparing sense of irony, Rumaan Alam's second novel is both heartfelt and thought-provoking.

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More than anything, though, this is a coming-of-middle-age story. The writing is lovely, and the details of Rebecca's life, the passing mentions about the news, about her career, about her husband, give it specificity th [...]

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant!

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege.This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a black son, so race is a theme, but it wasn't touched on as heavily as I thought it would be. It was very clear that Rebecca is oblivious to her privilege, and though I found her thoughts interesting, she was also infuri [...]

    This is a moving, thought-provoking book about motherhood, parenthood, adoption, class, race and most of all the power of love. When Rebecca Stone gives birth to her son Jacob, she finds herself lost in the unknown. Struggling with a newborn, her busy husband, and her aspirations as a poet, she hires Priscilla Johnson to be her nanny. Rebecca comes to rely on Priscilla to teach her how to be a mother while also freeing her to work on her poetry. Rebecca sees Priscilla as a friend, but does not a [...]

    I went into this thinking that it would be an "issues" book, but it is far more than that. It is really a character study of a particular woman, a particular mother over time. That this particular mother adopted a child of another race was important and would certainly generate discussion in a book group, but what fascinated me was Rebecca herself, her feelings, her motivations. I won't say that I liked her, because I didn't, not always, but Alam made me want to know what she was thinking. Recom [...]

    Complex story about motherhood, race, family and relationships. The characters were well-developed and realistic and I feel that he understands women really well. He writes a realistic description of breastfeeding, which I barely understand, and I did it! Not a fast-paced, plot driven book but I connected easily to the characters, who were flawed but endearing.

    I'm still making my mind up about this one. Even though there are weighty theme and big questions (what is family? what kinds of debts can never be repaid? which ones should we try to repay anyway? can a black boy and a white boy truly be brothers?) coursing through the novel, there's a fundamental pillowy softness to Rebecca's life that permeates the book itself. Rebecca bakes banana bread, hugs her children, sits in her office thinking about Princess Diana, wins poetry prizes, goes to bed and [...]

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